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Thursday, June 29, 2017

Opinion // Jews, Guns & Evangelicals

Opinion // Jews, Guns & Evangelicals

13:16 05 January in 2016 January-February, Politics
7 Comments

by Sarah Posner

Evangelical Christians who don’t support guns deserve and need our support.

 

After the San Bernardino massacre in December, Jerry Falwell Jr., president of Liberty University and son of the late Moral Majority founder Jerry Falwell, encouraged students to carry guns because “if more good people had concealed-carry permits, then we could end those Muslims before they walk in and kill.” Falwell’s 10,000-student-strong audience at the mandatory weekly convocation in the university’s basketball arena cheered and applauded. But Falwell was also subjected to a swift and harsh rebuke from fellow evangelicals.

The Rev. Rob Schenck, a prominent evangelical confidant of conservative politicians and power brokers, called Falwell’s statement “morally reprehensible” and “tactically reckless.” Shane Claiborne, a leading figure in a more liberal movement of younger evangelicals, wrote in reaction to Falwell’s statement, “The Jesus I worship did not carry a gun. He carried a cross.” Brian McLaren, a generation older than Claiborne but like-minded on evangelicalism and politics, wrote to Falwell in an open letter, “I feel impelled by conscience to repudiate your words as not being representative of authentic Christianity as I, and thousands like me, understand it.”

Dissent came even from within the university itself. Moriah Wierschem, a Liberty sophomore, criticized Falwell’s stance in evangelicalism’s flagship magazine, Christianity Today, noting, “Guns are not the biggest problem here, though; it’s the tone of our conversation over guns—and killing.”

Liberal, pro-gun control Jews need to start a conversation with these evangelicals—and even with Falwell. I say this not as a Pollyannaish believer in interfaith dialogue—I’m generally a skeptic—or even in the hope of generating a coalition of strange bedfellows to take on the gun lobby. Instead, I believe that this moment demands a cross-cultural conversation that will shed light on the respective embedded, communal commitments of both Jews and evangelicals. This could potentially lead to more fruitful organizing strategies for the broader battle against gun violence.

Generally speaking, evangelicals have a strong sense of kinship with Jews. For many, that kinship is rooted in the Bible—in their belief that Jews are God’s chosen people and, in some cases, that Jews are a crucial part of God’s plan for Christianity and the world to come. As a result, many evangelicals tend to focus on Israel as the political issue that binds them to Jews.


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In reporting on evangelicals across more than a decade, I have frequently been asked if I’m “a believer,” “a Christian,” or other code for “Are you one of us?” When I reply that I’m Jewish—even though I can think of few other circumstances in which a reporter is asked to verify her religious beliefs—my answer is typically met with unmitigated joy and a response such as “I love the Jewish people.” On occasion, that’s followed by an offer to help me find salvation in Jesus Christ, which I always politely decline.

Many of these evangelicals don’t know many Jews; they don’t understand the diversity of observance and practice among American Jews, nor are they familiar with most Jews’ liberal stances on culture war issues, gun control included. Many liberal Jews, for their part, hold stereotypes of evangelicals as intolerant Bible-thumpers.

But that’s too simple a view, and changes of heart are possible even on such hot-button cultural issues—as Schenck’s own story illustrates. Schenck, whose Capitol Hill-headquartered Christian outreach group Faith and Action brings him in regular close contact with Republican leaders and policymakers, had a come-to-Jesus moment, so to speak, on guns. In 2014, he began to quietly wage what he told me was a “lonely battle” to break evangelicals’ “unholy alliance” with the National Rifle Association.

Schenck, as documented in the 2015 film Armor of Light, has embarked on a one-person campaign to unlink evangelicalism and guns—an effort that he has discovered is harder than arguing over the meaning of Bible verses. It requires a dismantling of embedded cultural values, like those Falwell articulated in his convocation speech, that are proving stubborn.

In the film, Schenck makes no headway with evangelical colleagues, even members of his own staff. Guns, a colleague tells him, “are in our DNA,” an argument that shuts down any discussion of whether the Bible sanctions gun use. “Fox News and the NRA aren’t theological authorities,” Schenck protests, but the viewer senses that for this group, at least, Schenck may be too late.

But the outcry against Falwell’s San Bernardino comments suggests that there are indeed divisions within evangelical communities—divisions that could offer an opening to Jewish outreach. And many Jewish organizations recently have strengthened their efforts against gun violence. The Reform movement has made it a lobbying priority, citing the traditional Jewish emphasis on “the sanctity and primary value of human life.” Six major groups representing the Conservative, Reform and Reconstructionist movements, as well as others, have signed onto Faiths United Against Gun Violence.

Real political change within communities on hot-button issues requires more than a few prominent figures taking a contrarian position. As the sociologist Lydia Bean has shown in a recent report for the New America Foundation, an evangelical movement to combat climate change failed because it relied on a handful of evangelical leaders signing public statements with environmental advocates, unaccompanied by meaningful political organizing of their constituencies.

Maybe that’s where the Jewish community comes in, with its well-organized gun control efforts and otherwise positive image in evangelical circles. “Interfaith dialogue” is often superficial and transitory. No one wants to have a contrived conversation in a sanctuary, conference room or social hall. But in the case of guns—as opposed to abortion, for example—a conversation might be possible. Or, at least, worth a try.

Sarah Posner is a senior correspondent for Religion Dispatches and a freelance investigative journalist.

7 Comments
  • Harry Freiberg 16:04h, 05 January Reply

    Evangelical Christianity is the antithesis of what Judaism is, or should be…

    Nuf said.

  • David 16:34h, 05 January Reply

    I see. And should Jews who actually care about the Constitution and their rights join up with the other segment of Evangelicals to make this point?

  • Steve V. 18:01h, 05 January Reply

    Reasonable discussion across the divide is always advisable – and necessary. To take stance such as David has, please understand that we who adviocate for gun control are also defending the constitution – because of what the plain language says. Language such as “actually care about the constitution” doesn’t start discussion – it ends it before it has a chance to start. So let’s talk about that presumption a tiny bit: There’s nothing “organized militia” by any stretch of the imagination that involves citizens carrying concealed weapons around. And, on that same note, the U.S. Constitution is not Torah – we know for sure who wrote it, and we have lots of sources that tell us what they meant.

  • Steve V. 18:01h, 05 January Reply

    Reasonable discussion across the divide is always advisable – and necessary. To take stance such as David has, please understand that we who advocate for gun control are also defending the constitution – because of what the plain language says. Language such as “actually care about the constitution” doesn’t start discussion – it ends it before it has a chance to start. So let’s talk about that presumption a tiny bit: There’s nothing “organized militia” by any stretch of the imagination that involves citizens carrying concealed weapons around. And, on that same note, the U.S. Constitution is not Torah – we know for sure who wrote it, and we have lots of sources that tell us what they meant.

    • Gary Buck 14:42h, 10 February Reply

      If you have taken the time to study Torah and Talmud, the right of self defense is quite clear. As an observant Jew,gun control is NOT KOSHER. I refuse to succumb to the gas-chamber mentality of the anti gun lobby.When I say never again I mean it. If Hitler had not enforced gun control, the final solution may have had a different outcome.The Jewish heroes of Warsaw proved that point The second amendment is my protection against tyranny. I am a European Jewish immigrant and proud to be an American.You “Born in the USA” Jews need to wake up, get your head out of your a**es, be thankful for the constitution,Be a proud Jew and a proud American.

    • Bterclinger 08:37h, 20 December Reply

      Yes and the vast majority of those sources confirm that the Founders insisted all citizens be as well armed as the then current armies to prevent tyrant from taking root. You gun grabbing Marxist jinos are a disgrace. Perhaps you missed that great movie about a nation where citizens were disarmed: Schindlers List.

  • John Miller 15:01h, 27 February Reply

    Your article “Evangelical Christians who don’t support guns deserve and need our support” might be a little short sighted. We do not want to divide up our religions. Both the Christian evangelicals and the Jews should try to support each other without conditions. For instance, what if evangelical Christians would only support Israel’s leader if he/she was advocating a two state solution for Israel/Palestine or some other condition.
    Most evangelical Christians would support some kind of “common sense gun control” if you can show that it would really help our problems. Most of us are not against background checks, but expanding them probably will not do much to eliminate our problems. To city people and non-hunters it seems like it should be an easy matter to eliminate the assaults weapons, but in fact, most of the weapons purchased now for hunting are of the assault weapon type. This might seem strange to some but they do make great hunting rifles. They would be great rifles even if they only held 2 rounds of ammunition.
    The real problem with “common sense gun control” is the split in the parties. There are no common sense solutions coming out of Washington. Each side will not work with the other to get a reasonable solution. Just look at what is happening with a Supreme Court judge vacancy.

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