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Thursday, December 14, 2017

Ways You Can Support Moment

Ways You Can Support Moment 

 

In addition to making an online donation, there are several ways you can show your support for independent Jewish journalism.
 
1. Donate by check. Please make checks payable to Moment, 4115 Wisconsin Avenue NW, Suite LL10, Washington, DC 20016. We will send you an acknowledgment for your tax records.
 
2. International donations. Because we pay additional fees to process international checks, please donate online or email Johnna Raskin.
 
3. Donate by Phone. To donate by phone via credit card please call us at 202.363.6422. We will send you an acknowledgment for your tax records.

 

4. Donate appreciated stocks, bonds or mutual funds.  There is no obligation to pay any capital gains taxes on the appreciation. Please call 202.363.6422 or email our accounting department for our brokerage account and DTC number.

 

5. Give a life insurance policy. Donating a fully paid-up life insurance policy naming Moment as irrevocable owner and beneficiary entitles the donor to a charitable income tax deduction for the cash surrender value of the policy. Naming Moment as beneficiary, without changing ownership of the policy, does not generate an income tax deduction, but it is eligible for the estate tax charitable deduction. Please call 202.363.6422 or email our accounting department for our federal tax ID number, and contact your financial advisor.

 

6. Make a bequest in your will. This is one of the best ways to ensure your legacy of support for Moment and the gifts are critical in meeting our long-term educational, cultural and journalistic needs. A bequest can be made in the form of a specific gift of cash or property, or a percentage of the remainder of an estate. Moment recognizes our legacy donors online and in our printed materials.

 

 

7. Make a charitable distribution directly from your IRA: As of December 2015, the IRA Charitable Rollover was signed into law, allowing individuals 70½ and older to donate up to $100,000 annually from their IRAs to charity, without first having to recognize the transfer as income. Donors should consult their tax advisors about their specific situations.